Posted in Inspirational

Composing “Summer Wind” – A Song for the Holy Spirit

Central Philippine University Blog

One windy evening, in summer 1996, I was inspired to write a song. At that time, I just came from a youth meeting. I was the associate pastor of a local church and I was involved in the church’s youth ministry.

The young people shared a lot about their struggles and hardships in facing life’s realities. They also shared about the trials and challenges that were besetting their families, friends and for the professionals, their workplaces. It seemed that the situation at that period was so hard that everyone felt like they wanted to go somewhere else.

After I had dinner, I took my guitar, went to the lawn and sat on the white-painted steel chair. I strummed two chords, humming a melody while staring at the star dotted summer night sky.

Then the wind blew and the phrase that immediately entered my mind was “summer wind”. These were the beginning words that I kept singing and singing with the two guitar chords that I was playing. I hummed the rest of the melody until I became so drowsy and realized that it was ten in the evening.

The following day, with the melody still fresh in my mind, I added more words to the song. The outcome was a song reflection of what the young people shared in church and their life situation.

Basically, “Summer Wind” was a song I made in adoration of the Holy Spirit. When the wind blew that night, it reminded me of Jesus Christ who told Nicodemus that the wind blows wherever it pleases. You hear its sound, but you cannot tell where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the Spirit (John 3:8).

So the Summer Wind song is a prayer to the Holy Spirit asking Him to take the pilgrim to a distant star, wishing for a place where he could express his true self. The use of the phrase “endless sea” refers to the life horizons and the many possibilities that God offers to everyone. When you have faith in God, you do not mind waiting forever as long as you end up in the presence of the LORD.

The chorus petitions the Holy Spirit, asking Him to “take me to another time when I can find my peace” because genuine peace can only be found when you are in the presence of the Lord.

To many it might be a grim request to ask the Holy Spirit to “take me to a lofty place”, which definitely refers to heaven, the higher ground where true friends are all that we could see and meet.

You may view the full lyrics of “Summer Wind” at https://fromworrytoglory.com/2011/11/20/summer-wind-in-auckland/

__________

About the Author

Jonan is a freelance writer, blogger, copywriter, editor, and link builder.

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Posted in Inspirational, Ministry Resources, Songs

Mag-amba sang Pagdayaw Lyrics and Chords

Central Philippine University Blog

CHORUS I:

Mag-amba sang pagdayaw sa aton Dios
Dios nga Manunuga
Ihatag ta sa Iya ang mga tinion
Himayaon naton Sia.

Sa aton nga pagtoo kag pagsalig
Nagakalipay Sia
Isikway naton ang sala
Kag Sia pagadayawon ta

I

Si Cristo ang nagkari sa pagluwas sa aton
Sia magakari liwat kadalag-an naton

(Repeat Chorus)

II*

Amba pagdayaw, amba pagdayaw
Si Hesus ko buhi sa gihapon
Amba pagdaya, amba pagdaya
Si Hesus ko buhi

(Repeat Chorus)

CHORUS II

Dayawon naton Sia sa kada adlaw
Isinggit naton ang Hallelujah
Isugid naton sa mga katawhan
Ang Dios Sia lang ang gamhanan

Ibayaw mga kamot, magtoo kita
Isinggit sa katawhan,
Isinggit sa katawhan,
Isinggit sa katawhan,
Ang Dios…Ang Dios Gugma!

*I took these lines from the popular Sunday school song, “Alive, Alive Forevermore”.

[button url=”https://fromworrytoglory.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/mag-amba-sang-pagdayaw-with-chords.pdf” target=”blank” background=”#ccef2d” color=”#06096a” size=”4″ wide=”yes”]CLICK to view “MAG-AMBA SANG PAGDAYAW LYRICS WITH CHORDS”[/button]

Posted in Inspirational

Mag-amba sang Pagdayaw Lyrics and History

Central Philippine University Blog

CHORUS I:

Mag-amba sang pagdayaw sa aton Dios
Dios nga Manunuga
Ihatag ta sa Iya ang mga tinion
Himayaon naton Sia.

Sa aton nga pagtoo kag pagsalig
Nagakalipay Sia
Isikway naton ang sala
Kag Sia pagadayawon ta

I

Si Cristo ang nagkari sa pagluwas sa aton
Sia magakari liwat kadalag-an naton

(Repeat Chorus)

II*

Amba pagdayaw, amba pagdayaw
Si Hesus ko buhi sa gihapon
Amba pagdaya, amba pagdaya
Si Hesus ko buhi

(Repeat Chorus)

CHORUS II

Dayawon naton Sia sa kada adlaw
Isinggit naton ang Hallelujah
Isugid naton sa mga katawhan
Ang Dios Sia lang ang gamhanan

Ibayaw mga kamot, magtoo kita
Isinggit sa katawhan,
Isinggit sa katawhan,
Isinggit sa katawhan,
Ang Dios…Ang Dios Gugma!

*I took these lines from the popular Sunday school song, “Alive, Alive Forevermore”.

History of “Mag-amba sang Pagdayaw”

Through all years of singing and hearing “Alive, Alive Forevermore” being sung in Sunday schools and gathering, I prayed that God would give me a tune that would somehow become an alternative song.

In first quarter of 1989, I recall playing a melody at Sambag Baptist Church piano and suddenly the inspiration for lyrics came. Thus, “Mag-amba sang Pagdayaw” was composed and first performed at Sambag Baptist Church worship service.

“Mag-amba sang Pagdayaw” was first taught among Sambag Baptist Church youth. Then they sung it in one program during the Iloilo Kasapulanan Baptist Youth Fellowship Union in Concepcion, Iloilo in summer 1989.

Each time I had the opportunity, especially during youth gatherings, I would teach the song. I remembered teaching delegates at the CBFYP leadership training in 1989.

The Bethany Baptist Temple choir in Bacolod City sang “Mag-amba sang Pagdayaw” in 1991 during their Original Contemporary Christian Song concert. I stayed at the household of Rev. Jacob Delfin for two weeks to teach their choir the Ilonggo songs that I composed.

The OCCS concert with Bethany Baptist Temple choir was quite memorable because more than my first opportunity to perform in Bacolod City was the great chance to meet and befriended many brothers and sisters in Christ. My deep gratitude for Bethany Baptist Temple choir and congregation for their support and ministry.

Of course, Aileen Banasing, my co-officer in the Convention Baptist Youth Fellowship of the Philippines (CBYFP) suggested my name.

In September 1995, I submitted “Mag-amba sang Pagdayaw” to Far East Broadcasting Company who launch a contest for the “Pagdayaw” (Hiligaynon Papuri) album they were producing. Praise God, “Mag-amba sang Pagdayaw” became one of the songs of the “Pagdayaw” Album.

What started as an earnest wish to come up with an alternative song a song came up in God’s own perfect time.

Today, churches in Panay, Negros, and Mindanao continue to sing “Mag-amba sang Pagdayaw” or “Pagdayaw”. It is my prayer that they will teach the song from generation to generation.

All glory be to God, our Almighty Composer!

For lyrics with chords, please click this link –> MAG-AMBA SANG PAGDAYAW LYRICS WITH CHORDS

 

Posted in Inspirational

Rev. Malvar Castillon – Remembering Him

 
 
Guest blog post by REV. EDWIN LARIZA

Spontaneously three scenarios easily flashed back in my mind.

First, was our heated argument at the Camp Higher Ground early in 1980s (1983 according to a friend who could vividly recall the context) to the extent that I challenged him to a fistfight.

Second was his reported move to disqualify me upon knowing that I planned to run as CBMA president in 2001.

Third, was an undated incident in Bacolod City when he persuaded me to share the generous accommodation of his friend throughout the duration of an event which I could no longer recall.

The first scenario was a Convention Baptist Ministers Association (CBMA) business meeting where I lose my cool to his trademark skills (albeit annoying) of raising technicalities, he being well versed in Robert Rules of Order. Subsequently, his good laugh for outwitting his opponent.

The discussion was on pastoral identity whereby issues on involvement on human rights (at that time associated with radicalism subversion) were lumped up to traditional issues like smoking, drinking, immorality. He had outpointed discussants by his knowledge on parliamentary rules.

Being part of a progressive group, I participated in the discussion when acknowledged by the presiding officer. But he cut short my deliberation, insisting that he had still the floor.

In the course of heated arguments, he commented: “Doy, bata ka pa, daw kaisog gid sa imo.”

To which I countered: “Ngaa isog ka gid iya haw, dali sumbaganay ta” gesturing to attack him, if not for the intervention of cooler heads.

Only to hear his big laugh and comment in the end: “Tarso nga mga kabataan, indi na malahugan.”

Of course, the argument was just the tip of the iceberg of deeper reasons as during that period our group was the target for isolation of the CPBC leadership.

The last scenario could have taken place in between the first and second. Yet by the order of spontaneous recollections, the first two appeared to connote antagonistic encounters.

The last was a pleasant one, similar to series of interactions I had with him at his house every time we visited my wife’s hometown where he also was residing.

From these recollections, I would reflect on the life of Rev. Castillon.

The first two are his trademarks which unquestionably many pastors would confirm.

His insatiable and irresistible quest for what is proper and fitting thru argument which most often resulted to tensions, skirmishes or conflict but ending with his big laugh when you get mad at him.

For all these event, he appeared to hold no grudges.

The last were pleasant memories, which includes his generosity to help the young pastors in whatever ways he could, as he shared his past experiences of his painful struggles and persecution in advocating for truth.

Yet when I reflected on all the scenarios objectively, what appeared to be unpleasant are but reflections of his inner self, his true self, his principles, his objectivity.

For as I assessed the first two, he was just being true to himself – to be on the side of truth. He was correct to argue, to suspect, to criticize.

My lifestyle those times did not necessarily fit to what I should be. In 1983, I was not living an exemplary life, despite my principled stance and commitment to serve the oppressed people.

Similarly, he had the reason to campaign against my first attempt to run as CBMA president. I realized it was indeed untimely. After that 1983 event, I became inactive in CBMA for a long period . Then suddenly I surfaced from hiatus to aspire for leadership.

Good, I did not make it, at that time. For I could not imagine what would have happened to the association under my watch.

Analyzing further the two events, I realized the first one took place when we did not know each other personally. While the second after we have already established good relationship .

Here lies the true character of this man, the essence of his principle – to stand for what he believes is right without fear and favor, whether you are friend or foe.

And in the context of the Philippines where pakikisama, euphemism and related values are dominant, one’s honesty would bring him into trouble.

Standing for what you believe is true, proper, and just along with “the way, the truth and the life” here in the Philippines is never fun.

For his being consistent in his search for truth regardless of the cost, I now understand why Rev. Malvar Castillon was often misunderstood. .
________________________

ABOUT OUR GUEST BLOGGER

Rev. Edwin Lariza is a pastor and former president of the Convention Baptist Ministers Association. He is a social worker, teacher, writer, and leader. He is at present the head of the Department of Social Work, Central Philippine University.

After his many achievements in life, Rev. Lariza found passion in blogging. Read and learn a lot from this person through the “convergence of all our blogs” at Lariza.Website.

For those who haven’t known, Rev. Malvar Castillon had a stroke on November 16, 2002 at 70 years old. He survived after 57 days at Iloilo Mission Hospital but his mobility never came back. He remained bed-ridden for a year until his passing on January 24, 2004.

Jonan

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Posted in Inspirational

Remembering Manoy Malvar – A Touch that Dared Me To Dream with God

 
 

Guest blog post by REV. EFREN BURGOS

CPU Blog
Rev. Castillon is at center of second row.

I would always remember Rev. Malvar Castillon as one of the most “stormy” fiscalizers among Baptist pastors but he was used by God as instrument to have part of my pastoral dreams fulfillment.

In the early 1980’s when I was invited by Pastor Rowe Legada to be one of his wedding’s principal sponsors, I was deeply fascinated and challenged by the possibility of pastoral ministry in Concepcion. That was a dream, a visionary dream.

There are times in our life when we have to dream of our ministry visions. I was so touched to see a small church and listened to a brethren expressing their need for a pastor.

I fell in love with the scenic seascape of Concepcion, which is crowned by many beautiful islets. Most of all I love seafood! “If I would be invited to be a pastor in this place,” I dreamt in my heart during that time, “I will never refuse the invitation.”

Little did I know that dream and vision would be realized after two decades after. Manoy Malvar, as I fondly called him with respect as my elder colleague in the pastoral ministry, introduced me to Concepcion Baptist Church. The church invited to serve the church as their pastor in 2003.

And little did I know that would be the Lord’s leading to spare me from the stigma of politics when I was contemplating to run as Punong Barangay of Brgy Dungon A, Jaro, Iloilo City. I was serving as barangay secretary, then elected as member of the Sangguniang Pambarangay, appointed as chairman of the Peace and Order Committee handling the barangay tanods, and then as chairman of the Lupong Tagapamayapa, a barangay justice system.

I was at the crossroad, because politics was the very thing that caused me to resign as provincial public information officer of then Gov. Enrique Zaldivar of Antique and work at Central Philippine University.

The answer was beautifully shown to me by the Lord, thru Manoy Malvar – pastoral ministry! And this was a realization of the vision which I dreamt before.

To many, Manoy Malvar was a hard-hitting fiscalizer. His unwavering brand of advocacy for righteousness. Not many could see the good points in him, nor in his methods of drawing the best in one’s person.

But there was something that I cannot help but notice. I see the virtues of his strong aura of pastoral spirituality. He and Manay Nitz were both appreciative of good preaching and pastoral ministry. They made me feel at home while I was temporarily staying with them or even when I was already staying in the parsonage because their house is next to Concepcion Baptist Church.

I also observed his dedicated early morning Bible reading, probably a discipline he developed in his very rich pastoral experiences in many local churches under the Convention of Philippine Baptist Churches. These include Romblon and Mindoro where he was remembered to have “launched diligently and industriously the intensive program of evangelism and extensions” in about 11 areas; as former chaplain and educator at Filamer Christian College (now a university); a political tactician and consultant in the municipal politics of Ajuy and Concepcion.

He was the golden jubilee president of the Convention Baptist Ministers Association where he is remembered for his strong sentiment of “uplifting the socio-economic status of Baptist pastors as a step towards independence in thinking and action, and not being recipients of the programs set by foreigners who are sending funds.” “We have the desire to become financially stable” he said, “We are just beginning and struggling for total independence when it comes to money matters and maturity in leadership.”

It is thru the ministry of Manoy Malvar that I was able to work and see the beautiful substance of my pastoral dream in Concepcion. Concepcion Baptist Church is one of the flocks of God where I am always be lovingly welcomed as part of their family anytime.

Through him, God had given me the opportunity to revive its pre-school ministry which I am now working to name it as Children’s Home for Integrated Learning and Development (CHILD).

Through his invitation I was able to see the local churches planted in several islets of Concepcion, by the evangelist pastors of the Convention like Rev. Apolonio Francia, Rev. Elias Laprades, among many others, but are struggling for survival.

Sadly, some no longer have worship services for months! A very disturbing reality which almost broke my heart.

Eventually it challenged me to set up the Northern Iloilo Island Church Ministry (NIICM), a program which supports the pastoral ministries of these local churches.

It is through such invitation and with the help of The Believers’ Fellowship we were also able to plant and support the Hillside Gospel Church in a place between Concepcion and San Dionisio.

It is through such invitation that the Lord enabled me to acquire a 2.5 hectares of property in Puntalis, just next to Puntalis Baptist Church. My dream for a retirement place for pastors and workers in Northern Iloilo is being realized. I already subdivided the lot for its future dwellers. I dreamed that part of it will be used as a camp site for young people and church conferences.

I would always remember Manoy Malvar as an instrument for me to look toward the future. To dare to dream with God, to be so in love with the Lord.

________________

ABOUT OUR GUEST BLOGGER

Rev. Efren Burgos ministered to Rev. Castillon and his family in his well and bed-ridden years and most of all in his dying moment. Rev. Burgos held devotional, say prayers, and sang hymns on the night Rev. Castillon was dying. He was also there the following morning to pray for the family few moments after Rev. Castillon finally went home to the Lord. All of these happened in a room at New Testament Baptist Church building, Mandurriao, Iloilo City on January 24, 2004.

Rev. Castillon suffered stroke on November 16, 2002 at 70 years old. He survived after 57 days at Iloilo Mission Hospital but his mobility never came back. He remained bed-ridden for a year until his passing.

On Rev. Malvar Castillon’s death anniversary, I requested Rev. Efren Burgos to write this blog post. Thank you Pastor Efren.

I am always grateful for all the overwhelming support that our family received during those trying years. Truly the bond of love that we have in Jesus Christ makes heavy burdens light. May the Lord’s blessing be upon you!

Jonan

Inspired by the message of this post? Please share your thoughts so to inspire others. Please post a comment. Thank you.

Posted in Inspirational

Koinonia – Blast of Christian Fusion Jazz

 
 

 
I am an avid fan of Koinonia since I first heard their music in mid-80s until now. I’m always quite amazed by the way they create and play music.

It’s quite a blessing to see video clips of their performances on YouTube. They are all virtuoso composers, players and performers.

The instrumental progression, artistic variation, and synchronization speaks of how instruments and artists communicate to create great sounds.

You’ve got to watch their video above, “Countin`n The Cost” to know what I mean.

For me, I see the group as quite revolutionary considering that the jazz genre was more known and recognized in the secular world, moreso in the 80s.

In fact, some people would readily relate jazz, especially smooth jazz music, to sensual and intimate images.

Thus, Koinonia, although appreciated by many jazz enthusiasts in the secular and religious streams, did not become very popular in mainstream Christian music.

Koinonia is a Christian fusion jazz group composed of musicians who are considered legendary in their musical field.  Below are a couple of notes I gathered about the group.


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

In the 1970s and 80’s, a fusion in jazz music occurred giving birth to a new, more electrified and diverse genre called jazz-funk. Some notable pioneers in this genre were: The CrusadersWeather ReportHerbie HancockAlphonse MouzonChick CoreaLee RitenourAzymuthEumir DeodatoJeff Lorber,Seawind, and Koinonia.

Though less known in the United States, Koinonia established themselves as a huge sensation in Scandinavia and Western Europe, performing to sell-out crowds from 1982 to 1991 in Norway, Denmark, Holland, Sweden, Finland, Germany, Switzerland and France.[1][2]

Their Latin-infused rhythms and upbeat melodies gave them a distinct and cultured sound. Taken from a Greek word used in the Bible to mean “intimate fellowship” Koinonia was notably one of the first Christian, though primarily instrumental, jazz bands.

Original Members

The original members of the band, which formed in 1980, were: (leader) classically trained guitarist, Abraham Laboriel on electric bass guitar, child-prodigy drummer Bill MaxwellDean Parks on guitar, Alex Acuña on percussion and drums, John Phillips on woodwinds, Hadley Hockensmith on guitar, and Harlan Rogers on keyboards. In 1981 the saxophone/clarinet & flute virtuoso Justo Almario, replaced John Phillips.

Dean Parks also left at that time because he did not want to travel. Chester Thompson joined one tour in Europe in 1987, replacing Alex, but he was never a member of the band. In 1988, Lou Pardinijoined the band on keyboards and vocals, and then, Koinonia disbanded in 1991.[2]


Koinonia says:

CPU Blog

A blend of fusion and west coast music….

They had their first live performance at the legendary club “Baked Potato” in 1980 in Los Angeles. The “original” band consisted of Abraham Laboriel on bass, Bill Maxwell on drums, Harlan Rogers on keys, Hadley Hockensmith and Dean Parks on guitar, John Phillips on woodwinds and Alex Acuna on percussion. At some stage Dean Parks left, and they replaced John Phillips with Justo Almario.

With 4 albums they became the first christian group that combined fusion with touch of west coast. All members are highly rated as some of the best musicians at their individual instruments and they have been recorded thousands of albums as studio musicians.


Posted in Inspirational

Sa Gugma Sang Ginoo

 
Nagakahangawa ka sang mahimo nga matabo
Indi ikaw makapat-od sang madangatan mo
Kadalag-an ukon kapaslawan ang nagahulat?

Nagatinguha ka nga malab-ot mga ginahandum mo
Apang sa alibutod sang kasing-kasing ikaw ‘gaduha-duha
Kadalag-an ukon kapaslawan ang nagahulat?

KORO:

Kun ikaw may pagsalig, sa gugma sang Ginoo
Indi ka magkahadlok sang buas-damlag mo
Tungod may nagahulat mga pagpakamaayo
Kun ikaw nagasalig sa gugma sang Ginoo.

Sa imo pagsalig sa gahum sang Ginoo Ang buas mapat-od mo
Sa imo pagtuman sang kasulatan Si Hesus ang tuytuy mo
W’ay sang kahadlukan si Hesus ang kaupod mo.

KORO:

Kun ikaw may pagsalig, sa gugma sang Ginoo
Indi ka magkahadlok sang buas-damlag mo
Tungod may nagahulat mga pagpakamaayo
Kun ikaw nagasalig sa gugma sang Ginoo.

ABOUT “SA GUGMA SANG GINOO”

This song was written around March 1990 for the Youth Choir of Sambag Baptist Church, Sambag, Jaro, Iloilo City. Several choir members were graduating high school and college at that time and they shared their worries about their future and what would happen next.

The stanzas describe the worries that they expressed. The chorus assures them not to fear the future for goodness awaits those who trust in God’s love.

The song lyrics were written in old Hiligaynon language. Some of the terms are spoken rarely in present Hiligaynon discourse. They can only be read in older Hiligaynon Bible and hymn translations.

Below is the English translation of some Hiligaynon words used in the song:

  • nagakahangawa – worried; concerned
  • makapat-od sang madangatan – sure of what would happen
  • kapaslawan – failure
  • alibutod sang kasing-kasing – core of the heart
  • buas-damlag – future; tomorrow
  • tuytuy – guide

“Sa Gugma Sang Ginoo” has become the favorite song of assurance of Creekside Baptist Church and Sambag Baptist Church members since 1990.

All grown up, matured and successful now, the young persons who first learned and sang “Sa Gugma Sang Ginoo” in 1990 have a story to tell and a song to teach the next batch of youth in the church.

HERE’S THE LINK TO THE LYRICS WITH CHORDS–>SA GUGMA SANG GINOO

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